Nursing Simulation Scenario: Postpartum Hemorrhage

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(YouTube.Com)

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Eating Disorder

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(Youtube.Com)

Why you should look forward to the bad days in nursing school (REALLY!)

Scrubsmag.Com
A Nurse’s Guide to Good Living
By: Sean Dent
http://scrubsmag.com/why-you-should-look-forward-to-the-bad-days-in-nursing-school-really/

image

Nursing school is a tough cookie. Just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, someone or something throws you that curve ball.

I always find it interesting to hear the “war stories” from current and previous students. The quality of the story stems from the description of how they were treated by the instructor and preceptor, or the staff nurses, or the physicians, or maybe even their fellow nursing students. The story is given a thumbs up or a thumbs down as a conglomeration of how the experience panned out for them.

If the preceptor was mean, then it was a bad day. If the physician was friendly and a good mentor, then it was a good day. So on and so forth.

Here’s the rub. A good day does not always equal a good learning experience. And a bad day does not always mean a failed learning experience. Remember, you are not there to have “fun;” you are there to learn.

Just because your preceptor was a jaded, burned out staff nurse doesn’t mean they didn’t pass on some important pearls of wisdom for you to take with you when you move through your career. And just because the physician was friendly and made attempts to educate or teach you doesn’t mean it will translate into important information at the bedside.

For me personally, the worst days I’d had as a student have taught me the most. I learned invaluable information from bad experiences, bad people and bad situations. I learned a great deal about myself, the type of nurse I want to be and the subset of skills I strive to possess.

Don’t hope for the “easy street” every day when you’re in class or at clinicals. You need to be challenged, you need to be stressed and you need to navigate through the badness. The badness is something that never goes away once you become a nurse. It will test your mettle when you least expect it.

If you get to experience the badness while you are a student, you will be that much more prepared to take it head-on when it shows up later in your career.

Some of the worst experiences will teach us the most. Any experience, whether good or bad, will teach you something. Be sure to pay attention.

“Don’t ask for a lighter load, ask for a stronger back” (adapted from Phillips Brooks).

Do you agree? Have your worst days at school or on the job taught you the most?

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Stress & Crisis

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(Youtube.Com)

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Unwitnessed Fall

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(YouTube.Com)

5 helpful study habits – straight from nursing schools!

Scrubsmag.Com
A Nurse’s Guide to Good Living
By: Scrubs
http://scrubsmag.com/5-helpful-study-habits-straight-from-nursing-schools/

image

We all know there is nothing easy about nursing school, but even the best students often are shocked at just how intensive a program can be. In addition to all the time you must devote to actually being in school and clinicals, a big part of your success depends on how you manage your study habits.

Regardless of how you’ve done in your educational career up to this point, you’ll likely find it necessary to brush up on those study habits and refine your process. Fortunately, many nursing schools themselves offer tips to help student nurses succeed, and we’ve put together some of the best advice here.

Additionally, be sure to check out our 10 great tips for nursing school students (which also has some study advice), and if you’re still looking for a school, you may want to visit our Guide to Nursing Schools.

1. “Be Prepared to Be Overwhelmed” – Learn Time Management Skills

Okay, that’s not the most assuring statement to start this list, but it’s the exact advice Rhode Island Community College gives its future nursing students. Fortunately, the school offers some tips to help overcome this.

The first is that before you can properly manage your study habits, you need to first manage all of your time. The school offers ahandy chart to chronicling what you do with the 168 hours you have in your week. The chart is a good way to realize where all of your time goes, and how you can carve out enough for effective study.

2. “Plan It!”

Texas Tech University Health Science Collegeadvises you to plan out the specific studying you’ll do each day, pointing out that random studying leads to random grades. In addition to planning out the time you will study, be sure you have a place picked out that is great for studying. Choose a place that has as few opportunities for distraction as possible.

Another important piece of advice that may be a little less obvious is that you’ll want to plan your breaks as well. Particularly if what you are working on is reading intensive, you’ll probably want to take a break every 30-45 minutes to do something physical, like taking a walk (even if it’s a walk to get a snack!).

3. “Don’t Do It Alone”

Mid Michigan Community College offers some very interesting statistics that illustrate why you should always have at least one buddy with you whenever you study. On average, you’ll retain 20 percent of what you’re taught if you just rely on hearing it once in class, and you’ll retain 60 percent if you go over the information on your own again on your own time.

However, that retention rate jumps up to 90 percent when you study in a group and share the information with others. The article points out that there are other indirect benefits from group study, including encouragement and moral support.

4. “Don’t Be Disorganized”

Villanova University states that nursing students “receive an almost constant flow of information while completing their degree.” This is certainly true, and part of that flow is the materials you will be studying.

Be sure to keep all of this as organized as possible, whether that means in paper form or in specific folders on your computer. After all, it’s impossible to study what you can’t find.

5. “Schedule a Little ‘Me’ Time”

While all of these tips are important, a huge part of your studying success will be ensuring you take enough time for yourself to avoid becoming overwhelmed. Jacksonville State University advices that using your downtime to “treat yourself” – whatever that may entail for you – is crucial to keeping “yourself healthy in body, mind and spirit.”